The Thrill Is Gone

While you worked last Friday, I moseyed to a movie matinee.

Boasting better than a billion bucks worth of worldwide sales, audiences flocked to ‘Avatar‘ with force and it seemed time to follow. The flick, now favored among Oscar options for Best Picture (uncommon for the Sci-Fi category), proved an entertaining experience, fashionable 3D eyewear et al. Given relaxation was the reason for vacation, I decided to double-down and watch ‘Up‘ (another Best Picture Oscar nomination nod) later that evening.

Initially, the range in ‘Rocky Ratings’ was minor: both ranked as reasonably entertaining ways to spend some time. But as I contemplated clips and quips from both, my scale started to swing—‘Up’ soared as I lost connection to ‘Avatar.’

Fondness for devilishly clever details in ‘Up’ expanded the movie’s entertainment value; conversely, outrage over cheap copouts from its counterpart failed in forming a long-standing liking of ‘Avatar.’

As researchers we strive to monitor consumers’ opinions in the moment, intent on protecting the integrity of their insight by securing reactions before they have a chance to slip away. But doing so fails, in part, to procure a rounded reaction.

The missing metric is the linger level; understanding both the initial reaction AND the end result after the excitement wanes and we’re left with our more methodical opinion. Measurement at the point of purchase only captures a piece of the psychology involved in the decision making process. To gauge a truly accurate account we have to collect consumer feedback on a continuum, speaking with the consumer several times over an extended period.

After all, who among us hasn’t altered an opinion about a product we just brought home or an experience we engaged in after the rush resided? Think about it for a few days and get back to me.

As is custom, some sounds to send you sailing into the weekend in style; happy chocolate and flowers this 14th friends.