The Link Between Customer and Employee Experience (and why I joined C Space)

I recently became a member of the C Space team. A big reason why I got excited about the company and was happy to accept an offer after several rounds of interviews was a little flash of brilliance that the talent acquisition team delivered at the very outset of my employee journey.

Peter Russell

Strategic Accounts Director at C Space

Much like customer experience, these types of memorable employee experiences are rare, especially at that initial recruiting stage. In a prior job, I worked with large global companies looking for international graduate business talent. I’ve seen the good, the bad, and the ugly from recruiters, even from top brands.

Why aren’t these types of employee experiences, and for that matter customer experiences, more commonplace? And what made this one at C Space stand out?

I can think of two reasons for the first question. The first comes from Harvard Business School professor Len Schlesinger (and a terrific President of Babson while I was a student there). He points out that despite all the evidence that companies achieve out-sized returns when they fully focus on all three members of the ”service trifecta” (i.e. customers, employees, and shareholders), most only pay attention to one. (Hint: it isn’t the customer and it isn’t the employee.)

Second reason is that delivering quality employee and customer experiences isn’t easy, and really, it’s the same skillset. Yes, you need to be omni-channel and understand the journey, but those are done right when one party takes the time to listen, empathize, understand, and trust the other. Then, magic happens. You have the space to co-create unique and valuable possibilities with and for each other. This is true whether it’s between support and customer, interviewer and interviewee, leadership and staff, or engineer and app user.

It’s no surprise, then, that a company specializing in customer centricity would come up with this brilliant little employee experience. Here’s what happened:

A former colleague and friend thought I’d be a good fit for the account team. Instead of asking for my resume, she invited me to an event. I was intrigued, RSVP’d, and showed up to a warm crowd the following week.

About 20 invitees and several C Space staff carried a lively discussion from the bar to tables where we broke into small groups for several round robin-style discussions. Employees shared anything and everything about themselves and the company, from the latest research to its history to the challenges and opportunities in the marketplace.

As first impressions go, it was unexpected, honest, dynamic, and fun. A great twist on the recruitment process, which is typically a chest-thumping affair. In terms of building trust and mutual interest, it worked. Really, though, it’s the story of how this moment came to be, the value it created, and the speed in which it was executed that reflects how the event team lived up to its brand’s promise.

With growth on the horizon, C Space needed to hire fast. But the talent acquisition team wasn’t finding people with the right combination of skills and cultural fit from its typical recruitment channels. They sat down to brainstorm with a core group of stakeholders, including members of the sales and account teams, marketing, and the President of C Space. In two short weeks, they had recruited their colleagues to invite potential candidates from their network, and pulled off the fun and engaging evening. In three hours (and over a glass of wine), C Space vetted several high quality candidates. Within a few weeks, I started with two other terrific new team members who had also attended. Three hires from one event… not a bad batting average.

The team behind the event not only created value and practiced what they preach, but they also precisely reflected several of the core values of the organization. They opened up and listened to each other and the needs of the organization. They said “I got this,” and pulled off a great event in record time. It left a mark on me and the other candidates.

That’s the kind of team and the kind of experience I can get behind, and it’s why I am excited to be a part of the team here at C Space.

***

Peter is a Strategic Accounts Director at C Space. Interested in joining the team? Visit our Careers page.

You may be interested in:

The physical brand

The physical brand Our physical experience with a brand is the brand. In our digital world, physical is disruptive. Daniel Sills is the producer of Outside In, a podcast that explores changes in business and consumer behavior and...

What being the number one supermarket really means

What being the number one supermarket really means

by Richie Jones (C Space)
Research Live

After a week of retail results, C Space’s Richie Jones looks at the changing landscape for the supermarkets and how it’ll take more than mergers to keep Sainsbury’s on top.

How millennials are disrupting healthcare — and how to change benefits because of it

How millennials are disrupting healthcare — and how to change benefits because of it

by Hannah Walker
Employee Benefit News

More than half (56%) of millennials visited a doctor’s office in the past year, compared to three-quarters (73%) of non-millennials, according to a survey from C Space Health.

Mike Sepso: ‘Esports are a New Layer of Sports’

Mike Sepso: ‘Esports are a New Layer of Sports’ Subscribe to the Outside In podcast: From Asia to the Americas, there are 320+ million esports fans around the world -- and the audience is expected to double by 2020. But the professional sport of...

Kohl’s is improving store performance by equipping managers with real-time customer data

Kohl’s is improving store performance by equipping managers with real-time customer data

by Hilary Milnes
Digiday

Customer data is going right down to the store level at Kohl’s, where the company is using it to serve managers action items around how to better drive sales in their stores. “These functional developments are becoming table stakes — that’s what everyone in retail is competing on,” said Bill Alberti, chief client officer at customer agency C Space.

Amazon Stock Plunges 10%: The Industry Reacts

Amazon Stock Plunges 10%: The Industry Reacts

by Hugh Williams
RetailTechNews

Amazon saw third-quarter earnings beat Street estimates, but its revenue and fourth-quarter outlook fell short of expectations, causing the stock to plunge 10% in extended trading. Christina Stahlkopf, senior research consultant, C Space, notes that despite the results, Amazon is still a unique business.

For the holidays, Walmart and Target are using physical store networks to compete with Amazon

For the holidays, Walmart and Target are using physical store networks to compete with Amazon

by Hilary Milnes
Digiday

Walmart and Target are getting holiday ready using the biggest asset that Amazon doesn’t have to drive sales during the shopping season: large store networks. Bill Alberti, Chief Client Officer at C Space, comments.

How To Love Qual Data At The Speed And Price Of Quant Data

How To Love Qual Data At The Speed And Price Of Quant Data

by Ken Yanhs
Forbes

Online communities can be a great way to blend quantitative and qualitative feedback together, particularly if you are looking for feedback from the same group over time. Companies like C Space and Fuel Cycle offer great solutions for building these communities and managing them over time, allowing marketers to engage with their customers and hear feedback in a deeper and more meaningful way.

The Majors Winners

The Majors Winners

The Drum

Created to highlight the extraordinary work carried out by both individuals and teams, across the creative, design and tech industries, The Majors awards – in conjunction with The Drum – took place last week. C Space took home the Major Marketing Team title.

Hasbro: A Blueprint for Play

Hasbro: A Blueprint for Play Subscribe to the Outside In podcast: Play is a product of our imagination and creativity. It’s up to play companies to turn great play ideas into fun experiences, then get them to market, fast. And there’s no bigger “play...